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Love Writing? These 6 Sites Pay You to Write (on Your Own Schedule)

Scratch that writing itch AND get paid in the process.

bird view of laptop, phone, plant, coffee and someone writing in a notebook

The internet is a beast with an insatiable appetite for content. As long as the World Wide Web is up and about, there will always be demand for articles, blog posts, and just about every other text that billions of humans around the world can read.

Just like every living creature needs to eat, websites need content every day, so folks who are skilled with the pen (or, perhaps more appropriately, MS Word) can fetch big bucks if they prove to be a steady source of online consumables.

If you’re raring to make money by putting your writing skills to good use, get ready for one heck of a buffet.

We’ve put together a list of websites that would welcome your quality content with open arms. Some of them accommodate a wide range of fields, while others are more specialized in terms of subject matter.

Either way, you’re sure to find a site or two that will pique your interest and stuff your wallet. Check out our list below!

  1. Reader’s Digest

Yes, this is the same long-running magazine that your grandmother used to love. Now, RD might become your favorite as well after it publishes your fantastic content!

What it’s looking for: Real-life anecdotes and jokes

How much you can earn: Around $100

  1. Writer’s Digest

While Reader’s Digest was woven into the fabric of 20th-century culture, Writer’s Digest hasn’t quite reached the same level of prominence. That is a shame because it’s rich in resources that can inspire the writer in each of us.

What it’s looking for: Personal essays and feature stories that focus on the craft of writing

How much you can earn: $50 to $100 if your piece is published online; 30 to 50 cents per word if your piece is published in print

  1. Rattle

If you prefer poetry to prose, Rattle might just be interested in looking at your finest verses. It has an online and a print journal, along with a weekly contest called “Poets Respond.”

What it’s looking for: Poems

How much you’ll earn: $100 for a poem published online; $200 for a poem published in print

  1. Unemploymentville

Talk about niche writing! As its name indicates, Unemploymentville features content that speaks to the condition of being unemployed. It’s not exactly Rantville, though: This site is filled with useful advice for job seekers.

What it’s looking for: Business ideas, personal stories about coping with job loss, techniques to improve one’s prospects of getting hired

How much you’ll earn: $25 to $75 per piece

  1. Listverse

If you’re a pop culture whiz, Listverse is the place for you! Think your knowledge of trivial details can’t possibly be of any value? This site would gladly publish your entertaining, well-researched lists. You can do that, right?

What it’s looking for: Top 10 lists on interesting topics lifted from history, politics, culture, entertainment, and even everyday hacks

How much you’ll earn: $100 per list (paid exclusively via PayPal)

  1. Narratively

Humans just can’t resist a great life story, can they? Narratively thrives on these personal accounts, and it would love it if your piece were written with considerable depth and sophisticated story-telling techniques. (Spoiler: It pays handsomely for such stories.)

Just updated: 50+ Ways to Make Money (including 30+ work from home jobs)

What it’s looking for: Long-form personal stories of human interest

How much you’ll earn: $300 to $400 per story (Yes. Seriously.)

If writing is your passion, you’ll relish the experience of working with these sites to get your works published. You get to scratch your writing itch and get paid to do so.

What are you waiting for? Start writing that irresistible hook. Once upon a time…

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